Category: Top research of 2016

December 14, 2016 1 min to read

Hot topics in chemistry journals

Category : Top research of 2016

C&EN partnered with ACS Publications to examine trends with chemists’ research interests in recent years. In the maps that follow, the data illustrates the annual growth rate of research topics from 2010 to 2016. Research interest data is broken down by CAS-defined topic areas: applied chemistry; biochemistry; macromolecula...

December 9, 2016 1 min to read

Wearable sensors were ‘the’ fashion accessories of 2016

Category : Top research of 2016

Researchers developed an armful of devices that monitor health and chemical exposure Michael Torrice Personal exercise gadgets and smartphone apps allow people to keep track of their heart rate, blood pressure, and how far they have run. Some researchers want to go a step further and develop devices that analyze chemicals in a person...

December 9, 2016 1 min to read

An enzymatic route to carbon-silicon bonds

Category : Top research of 2016

Bacterial cytochrome c demonstrated the first example of ‘natural’ organosilicon chemistry Jyllian Kemsley The heme group (blue) of R. marinus cytochrome c catalyzes carbenoid insertion into Si–H bonds.Credit: Science Silicon is the second most abundant element in Earth’s crust after oxygen, but carbon-silicon bonds are unhea...

December 9, 2016 1 min to read

Methylene activation reached new heights

Category : Top research of 2016

Technique that enantioselectively derivatizes targeted C–H bonds could have widespread applications Stu Borman An organic synthesis method that took flight this year could prove to have an unusually wide wingspan. Developed by Jin-Quan Yu and coworkers at Scripps Research Institute California after a 14-year effort, the reaction ad...

December 9, 2016 2 min to read

Liquid metals went to work

Category : Top research of 2016

Unusual properties of gallium alloys opened a door to stretchable electronics and soldering without heat Mitch Jacoby Dickey and coworkers create random patterns by dispensing a gallium-based liquid metal from a nozzle. The metal shapes are stable and free-standing thanks to a thin oxide shell that forms spontaneously in air. Credit:...

December 8, 2016 1 min to read

Scientists beefed up the antibiotic arsenal

Category : Top research of 2016

Researchers synthesized new molecules, turned to nature to find others Bethany Halford The battle between infectious bacteria and humans continued to rage in 2016, with the humans possibly coming out ahead as two groups of researchers managed to revitalize our antibacterial armaments—one by making new macrolide compounds, and the ...

December 8, 2016 1 min to read

Single-atom catalysts gained a toehold

Category : Top research of 2016

Studies showed isolated atoms on solids can serve as stable active catalysts Mitch Jacoby When exposed to high temperature in air, platinum desorbs from nanocrystals as PtO2 (gray and red), and can be trapped on CeO2 (gold and red).Credit: Abhaya Datye/U of New Mexico Mediating chemical reactions with a single catalytically active at...

December 8, 2016 1 min to read

World’s first PET-munching microbe discovered

Category : Top research of 2016

Bacterium’s enzymes break popular plastic’s bonds to form recyclable terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol Bethany Halford Two enzymes help a newly discovered bacterium, seen here in a micrograph, break down poly(ethylene terephthalate) commonly used in drink bottles and food containers. Credit: Science   Sludge from...

December 8, 2016 1 min to read

Mini factory made drugs on demand

Category : Top research of 2016

Continuous-flow system went from synthesis to dosage forms in hours Stu Borman The upstream reactor side of the improved version of MIT’s pharmacy-on-demand system (left) couples with the downstream isolation and purification side (right), which includes precipitation, filtration, dissolution, crystallization, and formulation units...

December 7, 2016 1 min to read

Biological structures of the year

Category : Top research of 2016

Nearsighted pictures portend farsighted applications Sarah Everts We might be tempted to think that structural biologists were just showing off by unveiling stunning snapshots of cellular machinery if we weren’t so wowed by the implications of their achievements. If there’s a limit to the biological complexity these scientists ca...

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